Posted in General Interest

How Wolves Change Rivers

Thanks to Gayle Walters Rose (Bodhirose) for sharing this with us for Wilderness Week.

“Wolves will travel to drink from a river. But could the presence of wolves lead a river to change its behavior?

George Monbiot: For more wonder, rewild the world In his TED Talk, George Monbiot poetically explains how reintroducing wolves to Yellowstone National Park after a 70-year absence set off a “trophic cascade” that altered the movement of deer, sent trees soaring to new heights, attracted scores of new animals to the area (think: beavers, rabbits, bears, bald eagles and more), and stabilized the banks of rivers making them less susceptible to erosion. Above, see that story set to music — and howls — by SustainableMan.org, who took the audio track from the talk and laid it over beautiful nature footage. It’s a glorious glimpse of how deeply the natural world is interconnected.

If you love this short video, definitely check out Monbiot’s whole TED Talk too. In the talk, he shares some ways we can get more involved in the re-wilding of the world … and why it matters to all of us.”

The credits for the video above: SustainableMan.org; info courtesy of TED Talk.

Author:

Jamie Dedes is a Lebanese-American poet and free-lance writer. She is the founder and curator of The Poet by Day, info hub for poets and writers, and the founder of The Bardo Group, publishers of The BeZine, of which she was the founding editor and currently a co-manager editor with Michael Dickel. Ms. Dedes is the Poet Laureate of Womawords Press 2020 and U.S associate to that press as well. Her debut collection, "The Damask Garden," is due out fall 2020 from Blue Dolphin Press.

13 thoughts on “How Wolves Change Rivers

  1. Beautiful photography to illustrate this important aspect of inter-connectedness. Steve found information on the speaker at the Euro Wilderness Conference site…a talk about the importance of mega-fauna in earlier eras: mammoths and such. Good find, Gretchen! Thanks for sharing!

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