AAEAAQAAAAAAAAWSAAAAJDc1N2IxZTU4LThiYjctNGM3YS1iMzJhLTA3MDk4OTY4MjFkMgIn preparation for the the Buddha’s Birthday in April, I drew two different views of a lotus plant. Much venerated in Buddhism, the lotus is one of the ‘Eight Auspicious Symbols’. It is also a delight to draw, as the textured leaves and petals of the plant encourage the kind of finely-detailed observation and drawing work that give richness and texture to an image.

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For my first drawing, ‘Lotus Plant’, I researched and focussed on all the interconnecting parts of the plant. Most drawings and paintings of the lotus concentrate on the flower itself; the next part, the stem, is submerged and thus often merely hinted at. And the roots, although many of us will be familiar with them as edible parts of the plant, are rarely depicted in art, since they grow deep in the muddy bed of the pond.

For a Buddhist, this concept of living in three mediums – mud, water, air – signifies a progression. The soul journeys from the muddiness of materialism, through the water-world in which we live and experience our daily, day-to-day lives, and thence beyond, to enlightenment in the ethereal world of light and air. That these parts are all connected, roots to stem, stem to flower, is reflected in my drawing.

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My ‘Lotus Pond with Tortoise’ shows the flowering plant, partly in water, and blooming just at the surface. A tortoise, resting on a rock, looks up at the lotus. Such a bright and beautiful flower is an inspiration to all who see it, tortoise as much as human.

In Asian culture, tortoises are sacred. The longevity and tenacity that they symbolize seemed to me to be a wonderful way to celebrate what the birthday of the Buddha means. We need to live long and work hard to reach enlightenment. And if the ageing process is enlightenment in slow motion, as John C. Robinson describes in his book ‘The Three Secrets of Ageing’, then my combining of the symbols of enlightenment with those of longevity expresses this process.

Those who have studied Kamisaka Sekka (1866-1942) may notice that the stones in my pond resemble, in reverse colour, his ‘Snowcaps’, a woodblock print.

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When we fall in love with a work of art, as I did with ‘Snowcaps’, with its depth and colour, and its suggestion of water rippling in two different directions, then that inspiration feeds into our own work and, like my lotus drawings, establishes and confirms our interconnectedness.

© Paula Kuitenbrouwer
Text edited and enriched by Janet Gough
Lotus (Botanical) at Etsy and at Amazon Handmade
Lotus with Tortoise at Etsy and at Amazon Handmade

 

One thought on ““Lotus Plant” & “Lotus Pond with Tortoise”

  1. Your artwork is sublime and I love the explanation you give us with them. 🙂 I know what you mean about other artists’ inspiration finding a way into one’s own pieces. Thank you for sharing this with us.

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