100_Thousand_Poets_for_Change_logoThe Bardo Group “100,000 Poets for Change” event page is HERE. Beginning 27 September (tomorrow), we’ll post work on Peace and Justice for one week as our participation. We invite others to link their own work to ours and, although the title is “poets” everyone (artists, activists, writers, musicians, bloggers) is welcome. Shortly after the event, we’ll collect your links into a page to create a commemorative collection like we did last year for Poets Against War.

More details are on The Bardo Group event page. Instruction on how to add your link will be provided on this blog within the text of each day’s post. We have designed our participation as a virtual event to accommodate bloggers and those who are homebound or otherwise unable to take to the streets. At least one core team member will visit your site if you link in and we hope that you will visit others as well.

Meanwhile, many of the wide variety of activities this event inspires will be livestreamed by event coordinators and participants. Please continue to check out 100 Thousand Poets for Change for videos and photographs from the world over and The Bardo Group blog for posts from our own collective.

An 2012 (year two) interview with founders Michael Rothberg and Terri Carrion.

The backstory on 100,000 Poets for Change brought to you courtesy of Wikipedia:

100 Thousand Poets for Change, or 100TPC, is an international grassroots educational organization focusing on the arts, especially poetry, music, and the literary arts. It was founded in 2011 by Michael Rothenberg and Terri Carrion, and focuses on a world-wide event each September.

HISTORY: 100 Thousand Poets for Change was initially conceived by Michael Rothenberg and Terri Carrion in March, 2011, as a worldwide set of events to take place simultaneously on September 24, 2011. Literary event organizers volunteered to host associated events in their own cities or schools. On September 13, 2011, the city of Santa Rosa, California, declared September 24, 2011, to be “100 Thousand Poets for Change Day” and Stanford University offered to archive all documentation and audiovisual records of the event posted on the 100TPC web site.

Ultimately, 700 events in 550 cities in 95 countries took place on September 24 in conjunction with 100TPC, and the event was described as the largest poetry event in history. Considering the series of events to be a success, Rothenberg and co-founder Terri Carrion decided to pursue non-profit status for 100 Thousand Poets for Change and establish an annual event in September of each year.

STRUCTURE: 100TPC was founded in Guerneville, California, but most organizational tasks are done by individual organizers of local events. Event organizers in individual cities volunteer to create an event in association with 100TPC. The organization’s central office then publicizes the event through its web site, social media outlets, and conventional press releases. The relationship between most local organizers and the 100TPC headquarters remains informal, conducted primarily through e-mail. Organizers do not become officers or employees of 100TPC. Organizers can communicate with each other through the 100 TPC Organization & Communication Hub, a Facebook group available to 100TPC event organizers, where they are encouraged, but not required, to work together and to learn about each other’s events to help develop event ideas. Local organizers, then, have full control over the style and structure of their events—their only obligation is to register their event with the main 100TPC web site. Some events are free; others charge an entry fee and donate proceeds to charity.

Most 100TPC events take place in September. Each year, the central organizers pick a Saturday in September as “100 Thousand Poets for Change Day” and focus their publicity on that date. Some organizers choose to create 100TPC events at different points throughout the year.

The concept of “Change” in the name 100 Thousand Poets for Change refers to social change, but is otherwise broadly defined and dependent on the definitions of individual organizers or poets. 100TPC events do not necessarily share political or philosophical orientation. The 100TPC web site describes the “change” as having only to fall “within the guidelines of peace and sustainability.

– Wikipedia 

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Photo on 2014-03-31 at 17.16 #3unnamed-18JAMIE DEDES (The Poet by Day)~ I started blogging shortly after I retired as a way to maintain my sanity and to stay connected to the arts and the artful despite being mostly homebound. My Facebook pages are: Jamie Dedes (Arts and Humanities) and Simply Living, Living Simply.

With the help and support of talented bloggers and readers, I founded The Bardo Group because I feel that blogging offers a means to see one another in our simple humanity, as brothers and sisters and not as “other.” Effective October 4, 2014, I pass the administration of the blog to Terri Stewart (Beguine Again).  Tthe Beguine Again collaborative and The Bardo Group are coordinating a consolidation of the two groups. I remain as poetry liaison and a member of the Core Team.

“Good work, like good talk or any other form of worthwhile human relationship, depends upon being able to assume an extended shared world.” Stefan Collini (b. 1947), English Literary Critic and Professor of English Literature at Cambridge

19 thoughts on “READY, SET, GO … The backstory on 100,000 Poets for Change …

  1. A sense of injustice is the driving force behind most of my work, whether writing quick-reads for struggling teen readers, or fiction for African young people. But there are other issues that spur me on too. For instance, why are women artists generally less well respected/recognised/remembered/revered than are male artists. This was a topic recently presented by Professor Amanda Vickery in a 3-part BBC series. Here is my post on one such English artist and her luminous work that celebrated the natural world and warned of the threat of industrialisation: http://tishfarrell.com/2014/06/25/yesterdays-shining-star-the-restoring-of-artist-mildred-elsi-eldridge-1909-1991/

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